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Nottingham Girls' Academy

Managing Negative Behaviour

If a pupil fails to comply with the code of conduct or meet expectations in or out of the classroom, a range of strategies and sanctions are available to staff with which to reinforce those expectations. The list of these below is not intended as a hierarchy to be followed in order, nor is it an exhaustive list. Every situation and pupil is different and some strategies on the list may not be appropriate to the situation or pupil; teachers will use their professional judgement to respond to negative behaviours and attitudes, reinforce expectations and re-engage pupils in learning.

De-escalation
  • A quiet word or private discussion with the pupil to highlight the issue and agree what needs to happen for things to improve.
  • Use of various de-escalation strategies: deliberate ignoring; distraction; body language; non-verbal cues; humour; change of teaching style; relocation; intervention.
Loss of BUILD points

Pupils will automatically lose BUILD points when they fail to comply with the code of conduct or meet expectations. The removal of BUILD points allows us to fairly identify those pupils who regularly behave well and meet our expectations so that they can be rewarded as described above. In most cases, the removal of BUILD points is accompanied by an additional sanction to reinforce the standards required.

Detentions and Restorative Conversations

Restorative conversations are intended to allow the pupil and the member of staff to have a reflective conversation so that they can repair and resolve the issue - helping both parties to move forward – or to catch up with missed learning time. The following questions should be asked as part of a restorative conversation:

  1. What went wrong? What made you do that?
  2. Who did it impact? How?
  3. How will we (pupil and teacher) put it right together?

To foster the development of positive relationships, teachers are responsible for leading their own restorative conversations in the first instance.

Detentions to allow restorative conversations to take place are automatically issued following repeated disruption to learning which has been recorded as a D2 or a D3 in ClassCharts. A D2 detention will last for 10 minutes and may be at break time, lunchtime or after school. A D3 detention will last for 35 minutes


If a pupil does not attend a scheduled detention, the sanction will be escalated with a longer detention, possibly with a more senior member of staff. In continued incidents of non-attendance at detentions more serious sanctions will be applied.

Detentions may also be set for truancy (see below), poor punctuality and other out of lesson incidents. Non-attendance at these detentions will be escalated in the same manner but may involve Head of Year rather than a Head of Faculty.

Faculty Report

Where a pupil regularly disrupts learning in a particular subject, the classroom teacher, in consultation with the HoF, may place the pupil on Faculty Report.

The purpose of this report is to provide the pupil with the opportunity to improve their behaviour and attitude to learning by setting individual targets and strategies.

Faculty Reports will be issued over a fixed period of no more than two weeks. The subject teacher must inform the parent (by a note in the planner or phone call home) and record that a Faculty Report has been issued in Class Charts. The Faculty Report should be retained by the teacher for the duration of the report and stored in the department once it is finished with.

Faculty Isolation

Where a pupil regularly disrupts learning in a particular subject, the classroom teacher, in consultation with the HoF, may place the pupil in Faculty Isolation. Their usual teacher will provide suitable work which they will complete sat in the classroom of a colleague within that faculty. This might be used to allow a teacher a chance to establish routines and expectations with the rest of the group before reintroducing the isolated pupil.

Faculty Isolations will be issued over a fixed period of no more than three lessons. The subject teacher must inform the parent (by a note in the planner or phone call home) and record that a Faculty Isolation has been issued in Class Charts. This may be preceded or followed by a Subject Report.

Prior to returning to their normal timetabled class, there should be a successful Restorative Conversation between the pupil and the classroom teacher. This may be facilitated by the HoF or link SLT member.

Pastoral Interventions

HoFs must exercise their professional judgement in determining when they need to involve HoY in supporting them with pupil interventions.

Where pupils persistently fail to meet the high expectations of standards and behaviour the relevant pastoral team will implement a range of strategies and sanctions.

HoYs will identify pupils of concern through the regular analysis of Class Charts data in discussions with their SLT link. If a pupil is regularly failing to meet the expectations set out in the Code of Conduct and/or in classrooms (across a number of faculties), pastoral teams have a range of strategies and sanctions available to them with which to reinforce those expectations and try to bring about a positive change in behaviour. The list of these below is not intended as a hierarchy to be followed in order, nor is it an exhaustive list. Every situation and pupil is different and some strategies on the list may not be appropriate to the situation or pupil; pastoral teams will use their professional judgement to respond to negative behaviours and attitudes, reinforce expectations and re-engage pupils in learning.

  • Tutor report
  • HoY report
  • SLT report
  • Instant isolation (-4 points) – only applied by HoY or SLT for serious issues.
  • Parental Meeting
  • Barriers to learning referral to SEND team
  • Pupil Intervention Plan
Routes 2 Inclusion (r2i)

When a pastoral team is concerned about the behaviour or conduct of a pupil they will begin the Routes 2 Inclusion process. This is a programme developed by Nottingham City’s Educational Psychology service to help identify and address possible root causes of poor behaviour. This may require additional accommodations or special routines and procedures being put in place for some pupils. These might include (but is not restricted to): positive report; time-out passes; safe-spaces for social times; amended or part-time timetables.

The programme is initially led by the pastoral team but may result in referral to the academy’s Learning Support Team. The SEMH Coordinator (Social, Emotional and Mental Health) may arrange additional support in the form of ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support) or counselling from CAMHs or our own in-house counsellor. The SENDCo may explore other barriers to learning such as dyslexia or dyscalculia or refer to specialists and educational psychologists from Nottingham City Council that specialise in areas such as behaviour, disability or autistic spectrum disorders. There may also be involvement from the schools Safeguarding and Welfare team who may be required to liaise with family support workers and social workers. Weekly Individual Pupil Needs Meetings, chaired by a member of the Senior Leadership Team, are used to coordinate work pupils receiving this level of additional input.

Serious Incidents or Persistent Poor Behaviour

In some cases, a serious incident or persistent poor behaviour may require a more stringent sanction. Any recommendation to use these sanctions must be submitted to the Principal with the appropriate supporting evidence.

The Principal (or Deputy Principal in his absence) will make the final decision on whether to apply this or another sanction. Such sanctions may include:

  • Fixed term isolation
  • Fixed term isolation at another school
  • Personalised timetable
  • Suspension
  • Placement at an Alternative Provision
  • Managed Move
  • Permanent Exclusion

When recommending the use of one of these sanctions, the evidence should include:

  • Relevant staff and pupil witness statements of the incident.
  • A history of previous sanctions, support, and other interventions received by the pupil.
Suspension

If a suspension is issued the parent will be informed by phone and a letter will be sent to the parent on the same day that the suspension is issued. The letter will give details of the reason of why the pupil has been excluded as well as the time, location and attendees for the re-admission meeting. The pupil will need to complete a reflection booklet and the answers will be discussed in their re-admission meeting.

The re-admission meeting will normally be conducted by the relevant member of SLT and the HoY. At this meeting, a re-admission contract will be agreed. The terms of this contract will vary according to individual pupil need and will usually be drawn from the above list of pastoral strategies and sanctions. The pupil will also be placed on SLT report for 2 weeks (minimum).

Managed Moves, Alternative Provision and Permanent Exclusions

The decision to permanently exclude a pupil is never taken lightly. The negative impact this almost always has on a pupil’s life chances is always a key element of any consideration and is why a permanent exclusion is a last resort at Nottingham Girls’ Academy.

However, there are times when a pupil’s behaviour is so detrimental to the safety, or education of others at the Academy that a decision to remove them from the mainstream environment must be taken.

In this circumstance, in an attempt to try and avoid a Permanent Exclusion, the Principal will consider whether the pupil might benefit from a fresh start at another school. This is referred to as a managed move; a trial placement at another school to see if a different setting and/or a different peer group can have a positive impact on the pupil’s education. They are usually only successful if both the pupil and their parents/carers support the move. A managed move is organised in conjunction with the Local Authority’s Fair Access Panel. They usually last 12 weeks, during which time the pupil’s behaviour and attendance are closely monitored. If behaviour and/or attendance does not meet the expectations of the placement school, they may terminate the managed move. However, if the pupil’s behaviour and attendance do meet the expectations of the placement school then they will take the pupil onto their roll at the end of the managed move.

If a managed move fails, or if pupils and/or parents/carers are not supportive of such a move then a placement at Alternative Provision (AP) may be considered. Alternative Provision will usually provide the pupil with a smaller, less formal setting in which the qualifications they study will be tailored to their age, ability and interests. Usually, a pupil on AP would not follow the same curriculum being studied in the mainstream at the Academy. The Academy has the right to place the pupil where they feel appropriate. They will monitor the pupil whilst at the provision and, should there be an opportunity to successfully reintegrate the pupil back into mainstream school, this will be considered carefully.  

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